Posts Tagged ‘uprising’

     The school system as a whole needs to stop being an authority figure shoveling information into a kid’s brain, just so they can spit it out on a test and never remember it again. We need to start truly teaching, and teaching in a way that makes the kids engaged and – not necessarily enjoy – but not dread going to school.

     I started out looking at different school systems for inspiration. I mainly looked at Finland, as I don’t think many American children would do well with an Eastern culture school system (Lots of homework, long school days, intensive studying, etc). Finland has a great way of doing things, less homework, more hands-on, and small class sizes. Oh, and it’s not just any teachers teaching. Only the top quartile of graduated teachers get hired. The result? 90% of teachers that get hired stay teachers throughout their career. (NCEE) Finland’s idea of creative and hands-on learning is something that even Japan has taken into account. Japan has started looking for more creative alternatives to merely cramming and intensive studying due to the fact that they’ve hit a creative ceiling in their economy. After decades of hard work, there is a rising unemployment rate in the country as jobs are filling up, and citizens are searching for odd-ball jobs to make up the slack. (Berlatsky)

Then I started looking at how I could expand on that idea of creative and hands-on learning. As an avid gamer, it was pretty obvious where my first step would be. Video games have a very strong hold on today’s culture, be it the 5 year old daughter playing Barbie dress up games on the computer, or a neighbor’s 16 year old screaming at the TV because he died in Call of Duty for the millionth time this week. Heck, I’d even go as far as to say even some adults dabble in games. My church pastor likes to kick back and play the latest Call of Duty more-so than his 16-almost-17 year old son! This forced me to look for how gaming influences us, how it works our minds, and how it could (and why it should) help in the class room. Before I had ever started this project I was watching some Ted Talks on Netflix, and I found one by Jane McGonigal. She suffered a severe concussion, and used a game she made up to help her through it. She later went and figured out why it helped. What she found was that it wasn’t so much a physical thing (although running around town doing quests would be great for our routine leg exercises!), as much as it was a mental thing. Gamers ended up staying in touch with friends as well as make new ones. They spend more time with their kids, with their loved ones. They gained confidence in themselves through their in-game character, which eventually bled into real life. Gaming improves our mental and emotional well-being, and even goes as far as to extend our lives.

     It’s pretty clear gaming helps us emotionally and in our lives, but how could it help in the classroom? What are some things that people think that just aren’t true? Well, the idea that video games (Violent games like Call of Duty or Street Fighter) cause excessive violence has a lot of back and forth, but there’s some hard proof and debunking on this PBS page on gaming influence found here. Now that that’s out of the way, let’s look at some ways it can be used. It can be used to teach physics, engineering, math, anything. Games like Portal by Valve already have been adapted to teach physics in some schools. Another game, Minecraft by Mojang, is used in engineering to design buildings and make rough drafts. If that’s not super ridiculously cool, please just realize you’re in the 21st century in America.

     All of this, though, is just in vain if we don’t know why we need to fix things, and change things up. We just have to look at the students themselves. An article by Psychology Today says, “and anxiety has been increasing. The average high school kid today has the same level of anxiety as the average psychiatric patient in the early 1950’s. We are getting more anxious every decade.” This isn’t okay! It’s almost guaranteed that if you ask a group of random kids, they’ll say that the highest stress comes from homework and inhumane expectations to get good grades. Most students now take AP and/or Honors classes to boost their GPA. This makes their overall GPA higher than 4.0. Student Nora Huynh in California got her report card, and cried for hours due to the fact she got just less than a 4.0 GPA. She is also to be excessively tired, really irritable, and has constant headaches. Asking some of my classmates, they all said that headaches are very common. The anxiety and stress levels we put on our students — to get good grades, heck, to get better than perfect grades, to have a job and pay for their own “toys”, to go to a college and pay for it (Even though student loans this year are already about to reach the $1 trillion mark with a half a year left)– is inhumane. We’re kids for goodness sakes. Not animals you can herd and manipulate. Not mere products of the assembly line in a factory we call the American Education System. It’s not right.

     So what– what’s the point. What am I trying to get at? I’m trying to say that our school system needs to change. It needs to move away from the wartime manufacturing plant that began in the Cold War, and shift into an innovative, productive, and efficient liquid machine. We know how it is, factories and big huge machines are done. It’s the age of smartphones, the age of Solar Freakin’ Roadways! It’s time to make our school system the same way. Easy. Efficient. Almost like liquid. It shouldn’t be painful to learn. It shouldn’t literally drive us insane. Yet it is. So it’s time for change. I want us to take a stand. I want us to make the change, not just for us (Let’s be honest, by the time anything changed we as students will be long out of school) but for our kids, and their kids to come. Make school about the students, about the learning. Not about homework, hours of studying, and sleepless nights.

 

     As students, as young adults, we have as much voice in how our lives work as anyone else, and even more. We should be talking to people who matter – Mayors, Governors – and working with them. Our work will just be ranting and complaining to them unless we have a solution to give. We start by talking to our school leaders, both student government and administration. Bouncing ideas off of each other, showing them that this can work and needs to work for the sake of the people! This needs to be a social movement, an uprising. It can’t just be a few schools, it needs to be many schools in many states, so that it spreads like wildfire. An idea of a school with MUCH less homework. With social media and gaming integrated into the system. We have the technology, we have the understanding. We even have the motivation to do it.

 

So let’s do it.

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